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Three states still outlaw CBD, but it's allowed everywhere else. Check our chart to see where your state stands. Pure Craft CBD offers CBD Oil 1000mg & 2000mg flavored CBD tinctures, CBD Gummy Bears, CBD Oil for Dogs and more! Discover Pure Craft CBD PURE CRAFT BLOG

Is CBD legal in your state? Check this chart to find out

Is CBD legal? Probably—but maybe not. It all depends on where you are.

CBD has been federally legal since late 2018—if it’s derived from hemp. But that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s legal in your state. We’ve compiled a state-by-state table of CBD laws, below, that will help you gain clarity.

Note: The chart below applies to unlicensed CBD products only. State-licensed CBD products sold in adult-use and medical cannabis stores operate under different rules.

CBD Legal Status, State-by-State

State Is CBD legal? Restrictions
Alabama Yes None
Alaska Yes No CBD-infused food/beverage allowed
Arizona Yes No food/beverage
Arkansas Yes No food/beverage
California Yes No food/beverage
Colorado Yes No baked goods
Connecticut Yes Food/bev must be registered
Delaware Yes Hemp grower must be affiliated with Delaware State University
Florida Yes Labeling is regulated
Georgia Yes No food/beverage
Hawaii Yes None
Idaho No Illegal in every form
Illinois Yes None
Indiana Yes Labeling is regulated
Iowa No Illegal in every form
Kansas Yes No food/beverage
Kentucky Yes CBD tea not allowed
Louisiana Yes Many product restrictions
Maine Yes OK only if CBD extracted from licensed Maine hemp grower
Maryland Yes Unclear
Massachusetts Yes CBD food/bev requires purity testing
Michigan Yes No food/beverage
Minnesota Yes No food/beverage
Mississippi Yes Must be at least 20:1 CBD:THC ratio
Missouri Yes Age 18+ only. Sales require state registration.
Montana Yes No food/beverage
Nebraska Yes No food/beverage
Nevada Yes No food/bev; CBD sales allowed in cannabis stores only
New Hampshire Yes Regulations coming
New Jersey Yes None
New Mexico Yes None
New York Yes No food/bev; purity testing required
North Carolina Yes No food/beverage
North Dakota Yes None
Ohio Yes None
Oklahoma Yes None
Oregon Yes Label regulations coming
Pennsylvania Yes No food/bev; label regulations coming
Rhode Island Yes Label guidelines coming
South Carolina Yes No food/beverage
South Dakota No Not legal in any form
Tennessee Yes None
Texas Yes Label guidelines coming
Utah Yes Registration required for sales
Vermont Yes Can’t combine CBD with meat or dairy. Maple syrup has its own rules.
Virginia Yes None
Washington Yes No food/beverage
West Virginia Yes No food/beverage
Wisconsin Yes No food/beverage
Wyoming Yes None

The basics on CBD

CBD (cannabidiol) is a compound derived from the cannabis plant. Cannabis has been federally illegal since 1937. As long as cannabis has been illegal, so has CBD—even though it has no intoxicating qualities.

That changed late last year.

Now that hemp is no longer a controlled substance, and CBD comes from hemp, all CBD must be legal, right? Not so fast.

In December 2018, President Trump signed the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018 (aka the 2018 farm bill) into law. That Act included a section removing hemp from the Controlled Substances Act. Hemp and marijuana are both cannabis. The only difference is the federal government considers cannabis with less than 0.3% THC, the intoxicating cannabinoid, to be legally classified as “hemp.”

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Now that hemp is no longer a controlled substance, and CBD can be extracted from hemp, all CBD must be legal, right? Not so fast.

Passage of the farm bill “legitimized hemp as an agricultural crop as opposed to a drug/controlled substance,” writes Bob Hoban, one of the nation’s most experienced hemp attorneys. “However, while this legislation paved the way for the hemp industry’s expansion it in no way made the path to legal compliance any clearer for those in the hemp industry.” And by extension: It’s no clearer for those in the CBD industry, either.

As with all things having to do with cannabis, it helps to know which laws are in play: Federal, state, and those we’ll call “mixed jurisdictional”—the rules and regs enforced by health departments and the like.

Federal law

Federal law is now clear, thanks to the farm bill. Federal authorities are no longer in the business of arresting people for growing hemp, extracting CBD, or possessing either. The DEA is out of the CBD game.

More specifically, the farm bill removed hemp and hemp derivatives from the definition of “marijuana” in the Controlled Substances Act. The new law also specifically tasked the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with regulating hemp-derived food and drug products. (More on that below.)

State laws

Here’s where it gets complicated.

Federal legality doesn’t automatically confer state legality. Each state handles hemp and CBD differently. In Idaho, Iowa, and South Dakota, CBD is entirely illegal. In New Jersey, New Mexico, and North Dakota it’s legal without restriction. In Alaska, California, Washington, and many other states it’s legal but can’t be sold in combination with food or beverages—except in licensed cannabis stores.

In Vermont it’s legal, although when CBD is added to maple syrup it’s illegal to label the product “Pure Maple Syrup.” Ahh, Vermont.

FDA rules are coming

FDA officials are actively working to create federal regulations around CBD. After holding a highly publicized hearing earlier this year, their staffers have gone away to start crafting the regs. A first draft is expected in early 2020.

Those officials are in a bit of a bind. CBD has already been approved as a pharmaceutical drug in the form of Epidiolex, a drug created by GW Pharma to inhibit seizures. Epidiolex went through the FDA’s grueling drug approval process, and it took years.

After holding a highly publicized hearing earlier this year, FDA officials have gone away to craft the regulations. A first draft is expected in early 2020.

Once a compound has been approved as a drug, the FDA typically does not allow it to be sold in over-the-counter mainstream markets. But it’s currently being used most often as a dietary supplement, like vitamins.

If the FDA bans all non-prescription forms of CBD, it risks opening up a massive illegal market—which would result in a criminal trade in unlicensed, untested, and unregulated CBD. We’ve just experienced the real dangers of that with the illicit trade in THC vape cartridges, which led to the national outbreak of VAPI lung, also known as EVALI.

As we wait for the FDA to release its proposed CBD rules, agency officials are reminding everyone that many of the CBD food and beverage products currently on the market are not technically legal. On June 16, the FDA released a document that said: “We are aware that there may be some products on the market that add CBD to a food or label CBD as a dietary supplement. Under federal law, it is currently illegal to market CBD this way.” At the same time, no federal agents are enforcing that particular law.

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County health agencies matter, too

Even within states that allow the legal sale of hemp-derived CBD, there may be complications at the local level.

Some local health departments, for example, may choose to prohibit the sale of CBD in food and beverage products in commercial establishments.

A few years ago some restaurants near Seattle area began offering CBD-infused cocktails to their patrons. That ended when local county health officials stepped in and reminded restauranteurs that CBD was not a known and approved food or beverage. (“They’re erring on the side of caution,” one restaurant owner told me at the time. “They say they don’t quite know what CBD is yet, so they want everyone to hold off until they figure it out.”)

What you need to know

As of late 2019, the general rule for consumers is this: CBD is legal to possess and consume everywhere except Idaho, Iowa, and South Dakota. The rule for manufacturers and retailers is this: Check your local jurisdiction and vet your business plan with a lawyer who knows local CBD laws.

In 2019, Leafly editors tried to purchase more than 75 products to test their CBD content as part of our Leafly CBD Test series. To our surprise, it turned out to be more difficult than we anticipated.

National drug stores like CVS and Walgreens carry CBD products in some states but not in others. When we tried to order CBD products online, some companies agreed to deliver to the Leafly office in Washington state, while others refused. We know the cause was location, because everything was well and fine with our order right up until the point we entered our ZIP Code.

Is CBD Legal in the United States? (2022 CBD Laws)

Pure Craft CBD believes in a “seed to sale” philosophy to offer high-quality products consistently made with full transparency. Its mission is to lead the industry in bringing high-quality hemp cannabidiol (CBD)-based products to the marketplace and educate the world on the benefits of hemp extract. Its product line includes water-soluble CBD tinctures with Nano CBD, soft gels, gummies, CBD with melatonin, CBD pet tincture and CBD broad spectrum oil.

US CBD Laws At A Glance

When it comes to CBD in the United States, here are the main things to be aware of:
• Hemp-derived CBD that contains 0.3% or less THC is federally legal.
• The legal status of CBD at the state-level varies from state-to-state, so you must confirm your state’s CBD laws.
• Marijuana and hemp CBD laws should not be confused or conflated — some states allow both or one but not the other, or neither.
• Federally-allowed CBD can be mailed to all 50 states.
• You have many options for legally buying CBD in the US, even if you have to buy your CBD online.

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What Is CBD?

Let’s make sure we’re all on the same page, so we can talk apples-to-apples and not apples-to-oranges.

CBD, like THC, is one of many compounds found in cannabis. The amount of each compound depends upon the variety of cannabis (i.e., marijuana or hemp) the CBD oil is extracted from as well as the form of the CBD. For example:

• Marijuana has loads of THC and less CBD, while hemp has higher levels of CBD and little THC.
• Broad-spectrum CBD has 0.3% or less of THC whereas CBD Isolate has no THC.

Is CBD Legal Federally?

Hemp (and CBD) have had quite a long and storied commercial and legal history. Hemp went from being almost everywhere and used for everything to being the outlawed pariah of crops to reclaiming its place as an agricultural darling. Cue all those sayings about hemp coming full circle or the pendulum swinging back in the other direction….

Thanks to the 2018 Farm Bill (aka the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018), CBD products are federally legal to produce, purchase, and use if they meet certain conditions. To be federally legal, CBD must be hemp-derived and contain no more than 0.3% THC. And, as of 2022, 47 states have given CBD for medical and recreational purposes their seal of approval.

CBD that comes from the marijuana plant and/or exceeds the 0.3% THC limit’s still illegal at the federal level. While marijuana — with very few exceptions — remains federally illegal, researchers are allowed to study CBD from marijuana and its potential effects on health and wellness.

All Pure Craft products are made with hemp-derived CBD and contain 0.3% or less THC. So, every one of our tinctures, gummies, topicals, and softgels are federally legal.

How Legal Is CBD In Your State?

While the national government has blessed hemp-derived CBD with ≤ 0.3% THC, it’s not so clear cut at the state level. Each state determines its own regulations for CBD. Which means each state is different.

States CBD laws can vary in different ways. They may or may not regulate based on dimensions such as:

Usage: Medical (with or without a doctor’s Rx or medical-usage permit) vs recreational.

CBD Source: Marijuana vs hemp.

THC Level

Additionally, some states have rules around product labeling and the kinds of CBD products that are allowed. (Several states prohibit CBD in food and drink products, for example.)

You may see sates categorized — as Legal/Legal With Restrictions/Illegal or Friendliest/Friendly/Gray Area/States With Concerns — to make it easier to understand.

But, we don’t think this approach tells you enough of what you need to know for your state. There’s just so much variability! A better bet is to click on your state below to view its dedicated CBD Laws page.

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