Does CBD Oil Cause Body Odor

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Is CBD oil good for you? Bad for you? Something in between? What are the side effects of CBD oil? CBD is often touted as a non-intoxicating, medicinal alternative to marijuana. However, CBD comes from the same plant. Does that mean CBD smells like marijuana? Body odor that smells like pot is a real phenomenon, according to some of the world's most eminent biologists and cannabis experts.

What Are the Side Effects of CBD Oil?

Is CBD oil good for you? Bad for you? Something in between? What are the side effects of CBD oil?

Cannabidiol, or CBD oil, is an extract from the cannabis plant. It has boomed in the wake of the legalized marijuana movement, now that businesses can grow and sell the substance freely in several states.

Advocates market CBD oil typically as a health supplement, and they do so comprehensively. It has started showing up everywhere from web banners to smoothie shops. While it has few recreational properties, CBD oil’s boom in recent years is through the quasi-medical field. Like turmeric, ginseng and tinctures, CBD oil promises to ease a wide variety of ailments without the invasiveness of pharmaceutical drugs.

The question is… what is it really doing to you?

Does CBD Oil Work?

Cannabidiol is one of the two active ingredients in marijuana, but on its own is not enough to get you high. It can, though, help you feel better under the right circumstances.

While doctors and researchers take CBD oil’s role in medicine seriously, much of its profile has been raised by salesmen who make extravagant promises that no medicine (no less supplement) could hope to fulfill.

Some CBD oil salesmen promise that their product can cure everything from anxiety to cancer. They cram it into every product that can soak up a liquid, including gummies, shampoo, toothpastes and even pills for your cat. In the low-water mark for any “medical” supplement, you can now buy it at many juice bars and coffee shops as an additive that can somehow take your banana-strawberry smoothie to 11.

All of which is a shame, because this associates CBD oil with the bottomless deceit that is the world of medical supplements. Yet the substance has some early promise. As noted on Harvard Medical School’s website, CBD oil has some evidence linking it to treatment for epilepsy, seizures, chronic pain and arthritis.

There isn’t enough evidence to say that the oil definitely does help with these things, nor that simply cramming some in a milkshake will do the slightest bit of good, just that doctors are optimistic about their research. For more information on the medicine of CBD oil, see our article here.

What Are the Side Effects?

That’s how CBD oil might help. But can it hurt? Usually, no. It is generally not habit-forming, and most side effects are minor.

According to a report by the World Health Organization, “CBD appears to have little effect on conditioned place preference or intracranial self-stimulation… [It] exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential.”

“To date, there is no evidence of public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD.”

In other words, there is no evidence at the moment that CBD oil tends to be either physically or psychologically habit forming.

Dangerous Side Effects of CBD Oil

There are some known real risks to CBD oil, however. Be absolutely certain to consult a doctor before using CBD oil if any of the below apply to you.

It can lower your blood pressure and interact with medication.

Mostly, CBD oil is benign. Its side effects might leave you feeling unwell for a little while, but they will pass. But this is a medication, even if it is marketed carelessly, and that means it can have a powerful effect on your body.

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CBD oil can act as a blood thinner and in doing so it can lower your blood pressure. For someone who has issues with blood pressure this can pose very real risks.

It can also interact with medications through “the exact same mechanism that grapefruit juice does,” according to an article on the Harvard health blog. While rarely a significant concern, on certain medications these interactions can be harmful or even deadly, according to the FDA. If you have blood pressure issues, are taking prescription drugs or have ever been warned about ingesting fruit juice, citrus or fermented products, consult your doctor before touching CBD oil.

It can make Parkinson’s disease worse.

Some research indicates that CBD oil can exacerbate the symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease. This research is ongoing, but patients should avoid the product until more definitive results come out.

Mild Side Effects of CBD Oil

Most of the side effects of CBD oil are moderate. Unless you fall into one of the specific categories above, the odds are that this is a generally benign product with limited negative consequences, according to one research paper. Most of those include:

It can cause nausea and general sickness.

Nausea and gastrointestinal issues are a pretty common side effect of CBD oil. This can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness and other symptoms associated with a digestive problem (think how you would feel after eating something that disagreed with you). In part, some people simply don’t digest CBD oil well. This is not uncommon with oils and supplements.

However, this is also often caused by the fact that this is an unregulated supplement. There are no standards for dosage and safe measurement, so it’s quite possible that you could get an amount far in excess of what your body can handle. At this point, your body will simply flush it out. Unpleasantly.

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It can cause drowsiness and light-headedness.

This side effect should come as no surprise. Doctors have long looked at cannabis as a treatment for sleep disorders, and CBD oil is no exception. Putting you to sleep is a feature, not a bug. Just don’t be surprised if your CBD latte doesn’t pack the caffeine punch you expected.

It can cause loss of appetite and dry mouth.

Ironically, perhaps, for a cannabis product, CBD oil has been linked to loss of appetite in some people. Along with dry mouth, it can simply leave you feeling unpleasant after ingesting. As with most other side effects, this will pass in time.

Is CBD Oil Legal?

Like all things marijuana, the legal status of CBD oil is ambiguous and highly state-dependent. While many states have legalized it for production and sale, this still violates federal law. The Department of Justice has currently decided not to prosecute individuals for possession and sale of marijuana products in states where this is legal, but that’s a discretionary act.

Once again this gets complicated. When extracted from cannabis, CBD oil counts as a marijuana product. However, in some cases growers can produce CBD oil from hemp. The 2018 Agriculture Improvement Act made this form of CBD oil production legal under federal law.

Cannabis-extract CBD oil is typically legal in states that have also legalized recreational marijuana, however its status is usually complicated.

CBD oil in all forms is regulated as a medical supplement, because this is typically how it is advertised. As a result, only five states currently have no significant restrictions on its sale and consumption. Every other state has either restricted it through marijuana laws or limits the sale of CBD oil in some form, whether through food and drink regulation, medical regulation or other forms of restriction.

In short, there’s a different answer for this question for every single state. Make sure to research the laws of your state carefully, and for more information check out our article here.

The Bottom Line

Like most supplements, CBD oil rarely does what it promises. It does have some early medical potential, and doctors may prescribe it for patients at risk of seizure or with inflammatory issues. However, as an over-the-counter oil or when infused into a snack cake it probably won’t do you much good. You may see some benefits in connection with CBD oil’s anti-anxiety or sleep aid properties, but the odds are that any real improvements are largely psychosomatic.

Still, if it works for you there’s probably no harm in it either. Unless you fall into one of the specific categories listed above, CBD oil’s side effects are generally mild and of limited duration. Like with all medical changes, alert your doctor if you begin taking it regularly, but otherwise it will probably do neither harm nor good.

Does CBD Oil Smell Like Weed?

CBD is often touted as a non-intoxicating, medicinal alternative to marijuana. However, CBD comes from the same plant. Does that mean CBD smells like marijuana?

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Cannabidiol, or CBD, is one of the many cannabinoids found in the hemp plant. It’s revered as a non-intoxicating alternative to marijuana, offering similar benefits without making users feel high.

While CBD remains federally legal throughout the USA, marijuana is not. Many CBD users are understandably concerned about whether or not their CBD products are going to get them into trouble due to the potential “weed-like” smell.

The truth is that some CBD products can smell like weed.

However, isolated and pure CBD products that contain no THC shouldn’t smell like weed at all. This article will explain how and why different CBD products may have different smells and what to buy if you want to avoid the weedy aroma.

Table of Contents

Does CBD Oil Smell Like Weed?

The answer to this question largely depends on what type of CBD product you’re using. CBD is used in many different ways. It can be vaped, taken in capsule form, or ingested through the use of oils and tinctures. Some of these products release a stronger smell than others.

Generally, only CBD products made from high-grade, full-spectrum extracts will smell like weed. This is because most of the odor from cannabis is the result of terpenes. Terpenes are aromatic phytochemicals that are known for producing strong aromas.

Isolated CBD, however, has no odor. If you’re concerned about the smell of marijuana, you may want to make sure you invest in some CBD isolate.

Full-Spectrum CBD Oil

(Moderate weed smell)

$49 – $229
Royal CBD
Royal CBD Oil 30 mL

5 / 5

Total CBD: 500 – 2500 mg
Potency: 16.6 – 83.3 mg/mL
Cost per mg CBD: $0.12 – $0.18
Extract Type: Full-spectrum
THC Content:

Full-spectrum CBD oil is made using all of the active cannabinoids found in the hemp plant.

Throughout most of the United States, CBD products are derived only from agricultural hemp. Hemp is legally defined as any cannabis plant containing less than 0.3% THC. As such, there may be trace amounts of THC found in the end product.

Full-spectrum extracts also include all of the terpenes and other phytochemicals that are found in the hemp plant. These terpenes are responsible for most of the strong, skunky cannabis smell.

However, hemp plants are generally much less smelly than normal marijuana plants. As such, full-spectrum CBD oil made from hemp plants may have a mild weed smell. However, it is very unlikely to be as potent as regular marijuana.

Broad-Spectrum CBD Oil

(Some weed smell)

$45–$300
Penguin CBD
Penguin CBD Oil

5 / 5

Total CBD: 250–5000
Potency: 8.3 – 166.7 mg/mL
Cost per mg CBD: $0.06 – $0.18
Extract Type: Broad-Spectrum
THC Content: 0 mg

Broad-spectrum CBD oil is made in a similar manner as full-spectrum CBD oil. The main difference is that THC is excluded from the final recipe. Other psychoactive compounds, including terpenes, are often omitted from the end product.

This allows the manufacturers of broad-spectrum oils to market their products in regions where THC remains illegal.

Most of these products will not have much of a weed smell. However, some manufacturers choose to include or add terpenes to their broad-spectrum oils. These products can, indeed, smell like marijuana.

CBD Isolate Oil

$88.00 – $148.00
EIR Health
Eir Health CBD Isolate Oils 30 mL

5 / 5

Total CBD: 1500 – 3000 mg
Potency: 50 – 100 mg/mL
Cost per mg CBD: $0.05 – $0.06
Extract Type: CBD Isolate

CBD isolate oils are made using extracted, isolated CBD.

To make these oils, CBD is extracted from hemp plants and completely separated from other cannabinoids and terpenes. As such, these oils won’t have much of a cannabis smell.

These oils smell most like the carrier oil that they are diluted in. Most high-end CBD manufacturers use MCT oil for their CBD tinctures. MCT oil produces a unique but fairly subtle scent. Other companies may use hemp oil or even olive oil for their CBD isolate oils, so you can expect these products to smell like their respective oil.

What is CBD Oil?

CBD oil is an infused oil made from cannabidiol, one of the active compounds found in the cannabis plant.

Many of these benefits are associated with cannabis. However, across the United States and most of the world, cannabis remains strictly regulated. Most countries strictly outlaw its usage. Those that do allow it usually only make exceptions for medical patients who purchase their cannabis through the government.

CBD oils are generally made from CBD derived from the hemp plant. As mentioned, hemp is legally defined in the USA as any cannabis plant containing less than 0.3% THC. These hemp plants are often grown for the express purpose of producing CBD oils.

Will CBD Oil Make Me High?

CBD oil will not make you high. For the most part, the most significant psychoactive changes that people notice after taking CBD involve relaxation and sleepiness. Even so, most of these effects are not strong enough to impair their day-to-day functioning.

The reason CBD oil doesn’t make you high is because of the way that it interacts with your body.

Cannabinoids interact with a system known as the endocannabinoid system. This is a system present in all mammals that regulate things like appetite, mood, pain sensation, sleepiness, and stress levels.

Our bodies produce a number of cannabinoids called endocannabinoids. Cannabinoids found in marijuana and some other plants interact with this same system, causing different effects.

THC is a direct agonist of the endocannabinoid system. This means that it directly binds to and activates the receptors that are found in the system. This allows THC to cause direct and profound effects.

CBD, on the other hand, works indirectly. It does not bind directly to these receptors, instead of causing a number of different reactions indirectly. This allows it to affect the human body in

Does Delta 8 THC Oil Smell Like Weed?

Delta 8 THC is one of the many compounds found in cannabis. It’s very similar in effects to delta 9 THC, which is the ‘alpha’ cannabinoid in marijuana. When people refer to THC, they’re most likely referring to delta 9 THC.

Delta 8 THC, however, has gained traction because it falls into a legal grey area. Delta 8 THC can be found in hemp plants, which are currently legal across the United States. This means that many people interested in a THC experience can resort to using delta 8 THC instead of delta 9, which is often illegal.

Delta 8 THC can also be synthesized from CBD. Since CBD is also derived from hemp, products made from it (including delta 8 THC) can be considered hemp-derived products.

On its own, delta 8 THC doesn’t have much of a smell. Again, it’s the terpenes in cannabis that are largely responsible for its skunky odor. In order to make delta 8 extracts, these terpenes need to be removed during production. Therefore, raw delta 8 THC has no smell to it.

With that said, some manufacturers add these terpenes back into the final product. If this is the case, then the product will likely smell like weed.

If you want something that doesn’t smell, go for pure, unflavored, pure delta 8 THC oil.

What Type of CBD Oil is Best?

There are different benefits associated with the different types of CBD oil that we’ve described today. Whether or not any of them are ‘better’ than the next is a matter of your personal preference.

Objectively, however, most experts agree that full-spectrum extracts are better. This is because of a concept called the entourage effect. The entourage effect is a cascade reaction that occurs when all the active compounds in cannabis work together to produce ‘emergent effects,’ benefits that aren’t necessarily attributed to any individual compound.

In other words, CBD oil tends to work better when you use it as nature would have intended. Who’d have thunk?

Different types of CBD oil have other benefits, though. If you’re concerned about legality, you’ll want to use either a broad-spectrum or a CBD isolate oil.

Broad-spectrum oils are for people who want to take advantage of the entourage effect but can’t legally acquire THC. CBD isolate oils are for people who want to enjoy the benefits of CBD on its own. Isolate oils are also generally cheaper.

Final Thoughts: Does CBD Oil Smell Like Weed?

CBD itself doesn’t have much of a smell, but some of the CBD oil products might smell like weed.

Terpenes are the compounds responsible for most of the skunky cannabis smell, so if you’re purchasing an oil infused with terpenes, you can expect that it might smell like marijuana.

However, many other CBD products are terpene-free and don’t have any smell at all. Broad-spectrum extracts without terpenes, as well as CBD isolate oils or pure delta 8 THC oils (without added terpenes), will produce the same benefits without any of the weedy aroma.

Why Does BO Sometimes Smell Like Weed?

Body odor that smells like pot is a real phenomenon, according to some of the world’s most eminent biologists and cannabis experts.

The first time I noticed my BO smelled like weed, I’d just had sex with my girlfriend at the time. She nudged her nose affectionately into my chest. “Hey, you smell like skunk,” she said. I sniffed my underarms—she was right, I did.

Turns out I’m not the only one to have experienced skunky sweat. A Google search revealed several discussions and a Reddit thread where others talked about the phenomenon. Like me, most were baffled. “I smelt my armpit after working out,” Reddit user RIP_MAC_DRE told me. “I had been smoking for maybe two or three years at this point and noticed it smelled like weed; I thought it was pretty funny.”

I stayed up all night trawling the internet for answers. But my search brought up little more than the “top answer” on Yahoo Answers, which was just a description of how to wash. Undeterred, and with nothing better to do, I sought out some of the world’s most eminent biologists and cannabis experts and distracted them from far worthier business in order to discover, once and for all, why my BO sometimes smells like weed.

In an original piece of research for VICE, Dr. Matan Shelomi, a researcher at Germany’s Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, compared studies that broke down cannabis and human sweat into individual chemicals to see if there were any shared compounds. Out of 233 elements and compounds found in marijuana and nearly 100 in human sweat, 11 matched.

“It looks like several of the compounds most strongly associated with the distinct aroma of Mary Jane are also found in gym socks,” Shelomi told me. “Now all we need are a statistically significant number of sensimilla-scented volunteers and an olfactometry lab that’s totally down for whatever.”

Scientific breakthroughs started coming thick and fast. It wasn’t long before Dr. Shelomi realized the cannabis smell probably comes from apocrine sweat as opposed to eccrine sweat. Eccrine sweat is clear and watery, and used to cool the body down, while apocrine sweat glands, clumped mainly around the armpits and genitals, activate during sex and times of stress.

“I remember walking into a [high school] class before giving a presentation and noticing it,” Trent, from Kansas, told me. “Eventually, I figured out that my armpit sweat only smells like weed during or before a stressful situation.”

Dr. Shelomi used this as the basis for a potential hypothesis. “If [this] experience holds true for others, then we can narrow down the source of the pot odor to apocrine secretions.”

Another hypothesis, suggested by Dr. Justin Fischedick, a researcher at the Institute of Biological Chemistry at Washington State University, is that aromatic plant chemicals known as terpenoids and terpenes (“terps,” for short) are present in the sweat. Plants release terps from their leaves and flowers in order to attract pollinators and repel munching insects. “It seems like people who work out are noticing it quite a bit,” Dr. Fischedick told me. “Since [terps] are fat soluble compounds like THC they might be stored in fat cells and get excreted during exercise.”

That covers people who still consume cannabis, but I haven’t smoked any weed in years. Perhaps it’s because, when I was young, I got through enough of it on a daily basis to permanently alter my body odor. “It wouldn’t surprise me if heavy weed intake could alter your smell,” Dr. Shelomi told me. “Others online also report having stopped smoking but still reeking of it.”

I didn’t want to second-guess an expert, but this just seemed impossible to me. The smell, I figured, is more likely caused by dietary plants that share the same terps as cannabis—an idea mooted in the Reddit discussion. “There can be some similarities between the smells,” wrote user LarsHoneytoast. “I think weed, BO, and the lettuce at Subway are all in the same realm of scents.”

I needed to confirm this hypothesis, ideally with the help of someone who isn’t named after a breakfast dish. “The smell of cannabis is produced by its terpenes,” Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen, the executive director of the International Association for Cannabinoid Medicines, told me. “The consumption of other plants with the same terpenes may result in a similar smell.”

Thanks to weed enthusiasts constantly breeding new strains, there are now a host of cannabis varieties that share terps with many other plants; famous strains like Blueberry Cheesecake and Orange Bud are two notable examples. So there are plenty of plants out there that could make sweat smell like skunk.

But if cannabis-smelling terps are so common, why don’t more people smell like London’s Hyde Park on 4/20? Well, BO is not just caused by terps, but also by skin-dwelling bacteria that break down sweat molecules into smaller, volatile compounds that evaporate into smells. Apocrine sweat is also a cocktail of minerals, pheromones, and urea. It seems the skunky smell is down to a particular combination of these composites, making it unusual but not outlandish.

There could be many more people out there who have the right combination of factors to produce the chronic whiff, even if they don’t smoke weed. Naturally, they wouldn’t notice because they’ve never smoked marijuana and so wouldn’t know what to sniff for. Or maybe they know what it smells like but just don’t care enough to spend all night on Google, before bothering multiple scientists about it.

All that can be done for now is to trot out the old scientific banality that “more research needs to be done.” But at least Dr. Fischedick is up for it. “The only way to find out for sure would be to ask volunteers to smoke a bunch of dank, work out, collect some sweat, and measure it in machines,” he told me.

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