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12% of adults are smoking weed. This percentage remained relatively unchanged from 2015 to 2021. 52 million Americans will have consumed weed by end of 2022. Some people claim CBD oil isn’t working for them. The question is: does it mean CBD oil doesn’t work in general? Or is it caused by a sub-par product? This article explains why your CBD oil might not work for you. CBD, technically known as cannabidiol, has become an increasingly popular supplement in today's world.

Marijuana Statistics in the US: Cannabis Use & Abuse (2022 Data Update)

The United States cannabis industry has grown stronger over the past few decades. It even surpassed expectations.

This U.S. marijuana statistics report shows you how the cannabis landscape has changed over the years. It will also give you a glimpse of its future.

How Many People Smoke Weed?

12% of American adults smoke cannabis, says a 2021 Gallup telephone survey [12]. This percentage has not changed much in recent years. It plays anywhere between 11% and 13% from 2015 to 2019 [1].

However, this has had a significant increase from 2013’s 7%. It was in 2013 that the number of smokers was initially measured [11].

As for marijuana consumers, there had only been about 28 million marijuana users in 2012. This increased to 47 million in 2020. By the end of 2022, 52 million Americans will now have consumed cannabis [20].

If this trend continues, the number of people who use marijuana will increase to 71 million by 2030 [20].

What Age Group Smokes the Most Weed?

At 20%, it’s the millennials who smoke the most weed. They’re also the generation that consumes the most weed, making up 51% of the country’s cannabis consumers [12].

Gallup’s 2021 report showed that 45% of all American adults now have tried marijuana [12].

Of this percentage, millennials (1981 to 1996) make up the majority at 51%. Baby Boomers (1946 to 1964) follows at 50% [12].

Gen X (1965 to 1990) make up 49%, while the traditionalists (before 1946) make up the smallest percentage at 19% [12].

Of these numbers, it’s the young people who tend to smoke weed more, with 20% of Millennials making up the majority. This is followed by 11% of the Gen Xers as well as 9% of the Baby Boomers [12].

Again, it’s the Traditionalists who make up the smallest percentage at 1% [12].

When it comes to gender, 15% of adult men smoke weed than 9% of women [11].

Marijuana Use in Teens: How Many Teens Use Marijuana?

10.1% or 2.5 million American teens between 12 and 17 years old use marijuana illicitly, says the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) 2020 survey [31].

The 2021 report published on the National Institute on Drug Abuse website (NIDA) also notes that marijuana use is highest among 12th graders at 30.5%. However, this percentage has decreased from 2020’s 35.2% [21].

10th graders ranked second in marijuana users at 17.3%, a decrease in percentage from the 2020s at 28% [21].

Marijuana users among 8th graders also decreased from 11.4% in 2020 to 7.1% in 2021 [21].

Marijuana legalization, licensed dispensaries replacing drug dealers, and teens having a harder time obtaining illegal weed played a part in reducing their number, says a 2019 study published in Jama Psychiatry.

In states that have legalized recreational weed, there had already been an 8% decrease in the likelihood of minors trying marijuana [3].

Marijuana Use in College Students: How Many College Students Use Weed?

44% of American college students have used marijuana regularly in 2020. It’s a significant increase from 2016’s 39% says NIDA’s 2020 drug use survey [28].

43% of noncollege youth of the same age are also using marijuana in 2020. This percentage also increased from 41% in 2016 [28].

One factor that may have contributed to this increase is their reduced perception of marijuana’s risk of harm. The highest level was 75% in 1991 [29].

By 2002, only 35.5% of young Americans between the ages of 18 and 25 think regular marijuana use is harmful. This percentage has further decreased to 27% in 2010 and 14.8% in 2020 [13] [31].

What State Smokes the Most Weed?

The District of Columbia smokes the most weed at 30.81%. Vermont at 30.15% and Oregon at 28.53% follows [22].

On the other hand, Texas smokes the least weed at 12.81%, followed by South Dakota at 13.42% and Virginia at 13.82% [22].

Among the regions, the West consumes the most weed at 22.70%, compared to the South at 15.14% [22].

How Much is the Weed Industry Worth?

The legal marijuana industry in the U.S. is worth $27 billion in 2021. The recreational weed industry was at $15 billion, and medical cannabis was at $11 [20].

By the end of 2022, the legal cannabis industry is projected to grow to $32 billion. Again, the recreational weed industry gets the largest market share at $20 billion. The medical cannabis industry trailed behind at $13 billion [20].

If the market trend continues, the legal marijuana industry could grow to $58 billion by 2030. The recreational weed market could grow double the medical cannabis industry’s at $41 billion and $17 billion, respectively [20].

Market analysts predict continued growth in marijuana sales. There will also be more marijuana consumers by 2030 [20]:

  • From 32 million American people who use marijuana in 2014 to 71 million by 2030
  • From 1.4 million registered medical marijuana patients in 2014 to 5.7 million by 2030
  • From $20 billion in marijuana sales in 2020 to $58 million by 2030

Cannabis Sales Statistics: What State Sells the Most Weed?

California sold the most weed in 2020 at $5.7 billion in 2020 [1].

Colorado also comes in second with $2.5 and Illinois with $1.9 billion [1].

The state with the lowest legal cannabis sales is Iowa, with $6 million. North Dakota with $13 million and Vermont with $14 million follow [1].

In total, cannabis sales in the U.S. reached $27 billion in 2021, a $7-billion increase from the 2020s of $20 billion [20].

Which Has the Highest Marijuana Revenue by State?

California had the highest marijuana revenue at $1.3 billion in 2021 [6].

Colorado comes in second place, earning one-third of California’s tax revenue at $423.5 million [15].

Illinois also earned $317.1 million in 2021, placing them in third place [4].

California’s younger cannabis market quickly overtook Washington and Colorado’s more matured market. Both states legalized recreational weed in 2012.

In 2018, for example, Washington was the top cannabis tax revenue earner at $437.2 million [25]. California at $397.7 million and Colorado at $266.5 million came in second and third places, respectively [6] [15].

By 2019, California’s $638.1 million tax revenue has overtaken Washington’s $477.3 million tax revenue [6] [25]. In 2020, California’s tax revenue breached the billion-dollar mark at $1.03 billion and $1.3 billion in 2021 [6].

Of all the U.S. states, Washington has the highest excise tax rate on recreational weed at 37%. With the addition of other taxes, this goes up to 46.2% [34]. The state’s legal cannabis sales are only one-third of California’s at $1.7 billion in 2020 [1]. By 2021, its marijuana tax revenue is almost half of California’s at $630.9 million in 2021 [25].

It comes as no surprise then that its illicit marijuana market is still thriving. In D.C., for example, its illicit marijuana market is worth $600 million in sales per year [17].

The illicit marijuana market is also thriving in states where weed is illegal. Texas spent as high as $6 billion on illicit marijuana in 2022, and North Carolina came in second at $3 billion [20].

Which State Has the Most Dispensaries?

Oklahoma has the most dispensaries, with 2,129. California and Oregon follows with 1,440 and 1,344, respectively [10].

On the other hand, Missouri has the least number of dispensaries with one. This is followed by Rhode Island with three and New Hampshire and North Dakota with four [10].

What are the Average Dispensary Sales Per Day and Per Year?

On average, the sales of a regulated medical cannabis dispensary can reach about $8,219 daily. It can also earn $3 million annually [16].

Regulated recreational marijuana dispensaries and combo stores can earn about $4,932 daily. These shops can also earn $1.8 million yearly [16].

The unregulated medical marijuana dispensary’s daily sales reach about $2,027 per day. Yearly, it can earn $0.74 million [16].

Dispensaries that operate under a regulated legal weed market earn higher than unregulated dispensaries. One reason for this is the cap placed on the number of dispensaries that can operate per location. The cap lets them serve a bigger base of customers.

On the other hand, unregulated dispensaries earn less. They may be serving a large client base, but they’re also competing with more dispensaries, which eats away at their share.

Is the Average Dispensary Income Profitable?

53% of the regulated medical cannabis dispensary owners say it’s very profitable, and so do 45% of the regulated recreational and combo marijuana dispensary owners.

12% of the regulated medical cannabis dispensary owners say it’s moderately profitable. 23% of the regulated recreational and combo marijuana dispensary owners also find their businesses moderately profitable [16].

An equal percentage (29%) of both types of regulated dispensaries say they’re just breaking even [16].

9% of the regulated dispensaries are either losing some money or losing a lot of money [16].

Again, it’s the unregulated dispensaries that seem to suffer the most [16].

  • 42% say they’re only breaking even.
  • 4% say they’re losing some money.
  • 8% say they’re losing a lot of money.

Cannabis Industry Growth: Legalization Timeline from Medical to Recreational

It took California 20 years to legalize recreational weed in 2016. The state legalized medical marijuana use in 1996 [20].

Maine legalized medical marijuana use in 1999. It took the state 17 years to legalize recreational marijuana in 2016 [20].

Montana also took 17 years to legalize adult use. It approved marijuana for medicinal use in 2004 and adult use in 2021 [20].

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The states with short legalization timelines are Massachusetts and Virginia.

It took Massachusetts four years to legalize recreational marijuana use in 2016. The state legalized medical cannabis in 2012 [20].

Virginia has the shortest legalization timeline of one year. The state legalized marijuana for medical use in the past year (2020). It also legalized recreational marijuana by the next year (2021) [20].

This isn’t true for all states though. Hawaii has been waiting for 22 years to legalize adult-use marijuana. It legalized marijuana for medical use in 2000. Delaware has also been waiting 11 years. The state legalized medical cannabis use in 2011 [20].

Marijuana Legalization Facts and Statistics

Four more states legalized recreational weed In 2021. Two states also approved the use of weed medically.

In all, 39 states have now legalized high-THC medical marijuana use. 19 states have legalized medical and recreational marijuana use. Both include the District of Columbia [20].

Only six states remain where marijuana is fully illegal, and these are [14]:

  • Idaho
  • Kansas
  • Nebraska
  • North Carolina
  • South Carolina
  • Wyoming

74%, 248 million, or nearly three-quarters of the United States 332.4 million population, now have access to some form of legal cannabis [19].

44% of American adults also now have access to legal recreational weed [20].

Only 26% or 89 million Americans live in states that still prohibit the use of any form of cannabis [20].

Before 2030, we’ll probably see nine more states legalizing adult-use marijuana. Nine more states might also legalize medical cannabis [20].

If this happens, it could mean giving 67 million more Americans access to legal weed. 74 million Americans will also have access to legal medical cannabis [20].

68% (17 in 25 Americans) believe that the federal government should legalize marijuana. This has doubled from 2001’s 34% [32].

This percentage is lower than the 2021 Pew Research Center survey. In their survey, 91% of American adults say they’re for the legalization of the herb [9]. This is a 50 percentage point increase from the 2010s 41% [23].

  • Of the 91%, 60% say they’re for medical and recreational use. 31% say they’re for medical purposes only.
  • 8% are against weed legalization.

Of note, marijuana is still illegal under federal law [7].

Medical Marijuana Statistics: How Many People Use Medical Marijuana in the U.S.?

4.4 million registered patients used medical marijuana in the U.S. in 2021. By the end of 2022, this will go up to an estimated 4.7 million [20].

Analysts project that the number of registered medical marijuana patients can go as high as 5.7 million by 2030. They would make up 2% of the country’s entire population [20].

What Do People Use Medical Cannabis for?

64.2% of medical cannabis patients use it for chronic and severe pain, similar to CBD and kratom. 13% use it for muscle spasms and 6.3% for severe nausea [18].

Is Medical Cannabis Effective?

78% of cannabis users use it medically for symptoms and disease control, says a 2018 U.M. Institute for Social Research survey [33].

Of this percentage, 42% weaned themselves off of pharmaceutical medications. 38% say they reduced their intake of pharmaceutical drug use while being on medical cannabis [33].

What Do Americans Think of Medical Cannabis?

67% of physicians are now in favor of nationwide medical cannabis legalization, says a 2018 Medscape poll [8]. Medscape is a part of the WebMD Health Corp.

This percentage has increased from WebMD’s 2014 survey, which showed that 56% approve of legalizing medical cannabis on a federal level [24].

43% of Americans have already tried cannabis and CBD for medical reasons. Of this percentage [26]:

  • 32% say it’s a good alternative to pharmaceutical and traditional medical products.
  • 26% say they would choose it more than chemical medications.

Cannabis Trends During the COVID19 Pandemic

Marijuana sales increased by 38% in several states in March 2020, compared to January’s first full week of the same year. Cannabis sales peaked by the end of August 2020, increasing by 59% compared to January 2020’s first week [27].

Because marijuana was considered essential during the pandemic, consumers needed a way to get their supplies. This gave rise to curbside pickups, drive-through options, and online preorders.

New customer sign-ups for online ordering and delivery increased by 59%. There has also been a 44% increase in first-time deliveries [30].

For some dispensaries, online transactions made up 90% of their marijuana sales. In-person sales made up only 10% [27].

Cannabis stores that offered preorders enjoyed a 22% increase in sales. Those that didn’t offer the preorders failed to enjoy the same benefits. [5].

There has also been a change in the cannabis consumption trend.

The COVID19 virus affected the lungs more. Because of this, more cannabis consumers switched from smoking marijuana to edibles. This made edibles the top choice among cannabis products. By the time 2020 ended, edibles had already made up 22% of all marijuana sales [30].

Edibles became the top choice across all age groups, too, except for the Gen Zs.

People belonging to this age group still prefer their vapes to edibles, flowers (cannabis Sativa and cannabis Indica plant), and pre-rolls [30].

Will These Cannabis Trends Continue?

By the end of 2020, cannabis sales have gradually slowed down to pre-pandemic levels. However, some trends continued [2].

  • Marijuana delivery and curbside pickup were about equal in 2020’s first half. However, the first half of 2021 showed that more consumers are now in favor of cannabis delivery. Cannabis delivery made up 60% of 2021’s orders, compared to 2020s 40%.
  • Cannabis deliveries increased by 97% compared to 2020’s first half.

Edibles may have gained popularity during the pandemic. However, cannabis flowers still remained the popular choice. It made up 50% of the whole cannabis sales in January 2022 [20].

What’s the Future of the U.S. Cannabis Industry?

The future of the country’s marijuana industry seems pretty rosy [20].

  • The legal medical cannabis industry could increase from $9 billion in 2020 to a $17 billion industry by 2030.
  • The legal recreational industry could grow from $20 billion in 2020 to a $58 billion industry by 2030.

Final Thoughts — U.S. Marijuana Industry Outlook

We can expect the country’s legal marijuana industry to continue growing. The number of medical and recreational cannabis consumers is expected to grow in the coming years. In time, weed will become a part of daily life. Marijuana sales are up. Support for marijuana legalization on a federal level has also increased.

Social acceptance has risen as well. There are now more states with some form of legal marijuana than states where it’s fully illegal.

If market prediction stays true, the country’s legal marijuana market could easily become a $58 billion to $72 billion industry [20].

References

  1. 2021 Annual Marijuana Business Factbook. (2022). Marijuana Business Daily. [1]
  2. 2021 Cannabis in America. (2022). Weedmaps. [2]
  3. Anderson, D. M., Hansen, B., Rees, D. I., & Sabia, J. J. (2019). Association of Marijuana Laws With Teen Marijuana Use. JAMA Pediatrics, 173(9), 879. [3]
  4. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2021. (2021). Illinois Department of Revenue. [4]
  5. Cannabis, COVID-19, and Beyond. (2020). State of the Cannabis Industry. [5]
  6. Cannabis Tax Revenues. (2022). California Department of Tax and Fee Administration. [6]
  7. Drug Fact Sheet: Marijuana/Cannabis. (2020). Drug Enforcement Administration. [7]
  8. Frellick, M. (2018). Medical, Recreational Marijuana Should Be Legal, Most Clinicians Say. Medscape Medical News. [8]
  9. Green, T. V. (2021). Americans overwhelmingly say marijuana should be legal for recreational or medical use. Pew Research Center. [9]
  10. Hobson, K. (2021). Cannabis Dispensaries Growth Study 2022. Kisi. [10]
  11. Hrynowski, Z. (2020). What Percentage of Americans Smoke Marijuana? Gallup, Inc. [11]
  12. Jones, J. M. (2021). Nearly Half of U.S. Adults Have Tried Marijuana. Gallup, Inc. [12]
  13. Lipari, R., Kroutil, L. A., & Pemberton, M. R. (2015). Risk and Protective Factors and Initiation of Substance Use: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). [13]
  14. Map of Marijuana Legality by State. (2022). Disa. [14]
  15. Marijuana Tax Reports. (2022). Colorado Department of Revenue. [15]
  16. McVey, E. (2017). Marijuana Business Factbook 2017. Marijuana Business Daily. [16]
  17. Medical Marijuana Patient Access. (2022). District of Columbia Council. [17]
  18. Medical Marijuana Patient Breakdown by Qualifying Medical Condition. (2016). [Bubble Chart]. Marijuana Business Daily. [18]
  19. Moore, D. (2021). U.S. Population Estimated at 332,403,650 on Jan. 1, 2022. United States Census Bureau. [19]
  20. Morrissey, K., Reiman, A., Tomares, N., & Adams, J. (2022, March). 2022 U.S. Cannabis Report. New Frontier Data. [20]
  21. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). (2021). Percentage of adolescents reporting drug use decreased significantly in 2021 as the COVID-19 pandemic endured. National Institutes of Health (NIH). [21]
  22. National Survey on Drug Use and Health. (2020). 2019-2020 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Model-Based Prevalence Estimates (50 States and the District of Columbia). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). [22]
  23. Public Support For Legalizing Medical Marijuana. (2010). Pew Research Center. [23]
  24. Rappold, R. S. (2014). Legalize Medical Marijuana, Doctors Say in Survey. WebMD. [24]
  25. Recreational and medical marijuana taxes. (2022). Washington State Department of Revenue. [25]
  26. Richter, F. (2021). What Americans Think About Medical Cannabis. Statista. [26]
  27. Schaneman, B. (2022). How the US cannabis industry weathered two years of pandemic upheaval. Marijuana Business Daily. [27]
  28. Schulenberg, J. E., Patrick, M. E., Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Miech, R. A. (2021). National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975–2020. National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2. [28]
  29. Sherburne, M. (2021). Daily marijuana use among US college students reaches a new 40-year high. Michigan News (University of Michigan). [29]
  30. State of Cannabis 2020. (2021). Eaze Technologies, Inc. [30]
  31. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). (2021). Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2020 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. [31]
  32. Support for Legal Marijuana Holds at a Record High of 68%. (2021). Gallup, Inc. [32]
  33. Wadley, J. (2019). Many users prefer medical marijuana over prescription drugs. Michigan News (University of Michigan). [33]
  34. Washington state adult-use cannabis generates huge impacts, but the tax burden is high. (2022). Marijuana Business Daily. [34]
  35. Cannabis & Kratom: What’s The Difference? Can They Be Mixed? Kratom.org [35]
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Nina Julia

Nina created CFAH.org following the birth of her second child. She was a science and math teacher for 6 years prior to becoming a parent — teaching in schools in White Plains, New York and later in Paterson, New Jersey.

CBD Oil Not Working for You? 7 Reasons Why CBD Doesn’t Work for Everyone

If you’re not feeling any difference from CBD, it may have you puzzled, especially when you’ve read dozens of success stories of people living a better life thanks to supplementation with CBD oil.

You may feel scammed and have an impression that you’ve wasted money.

Although it IS possible that CBD oil won’t work for some people, most of the claims about “CBD not working for me” result from buying a poor-quality CBD product, or from unreasonable expectations from the compound.

In this article, we explain why CBD might not work for you, and what to do if you want to maximize your results with CBD oil.

Reasons Your CBD Doesn’t Work

There are almost 900 CBD brands in the American market. With so many products available at hand, there’s a risk you’ll stumble upon a fly-by-night vendor or a mislabeled CBD oil.

CBD has a long list of well-documented health benefits. There have been hundreds of studies conducted on its efficacy in alleviating a wide range of health problems.

People also use CBD as a means of daily supplementation with the purpose to support the endocannabinoid system (ECS) and keep the body in a state of balance (homeostasis).

So, why is CBD oil not working for you?

Here are a few possible explanations.

1. You Have a Low-Quality CBD Product

Unfortunately, poor product quality is more common than not. That’s because the CBD market isn’t regulated and there are no official manufacturing and labeling standards in place. This, in turn, results in lots of fake, under-dosed, contaminated CBD products getting sold.

In some cases, the hemp seed oil is labeled as CBD oil or hemp extract (containing ZERO CBD) as a means to confuse customers.

If you want CBD oil to work, you need to spend your money on the best CBD oils you can afford.

The good news is that poor quality vendors can be avoided with a few simple checks. It’s particularly important to do thorough research and buy CBD from reputable companies that test their products in independent laboratories.

Here are the must-check factors determining the quality of CBD oil:

  • Look for CBD products made from organic hemp. Organic farming results in CBD-rich, clean flowers, which are the best source material for extraction. Poor farming practices may lead to contamination with heavy metals and other toxins from the soil, and if the growers use pesticides on the plants, they will be absorbed too. That’s why you should steer clear of companies using mass-produced hemp for extraction.
  • Look for Certificates of Analysis from third-party labs. Lab testing can reveal the exact potency of CBD oil. The laboratory will also look for contaminants and potentially dangerous additives. The test results should be available for you to see for yourself.
  • Read customer reviews. Check third-party websites like expert blogs and online rankings to see what other users are saying on brand effectiveness, customer service, delivery time, and product quality.

Many CBD users admit they have tried several different brands before sticking to a particular vendor, so keep experimenting if your first try wasn’t a bull’s eye. As they say, sometimes you may have to kiss many frogs until you find your prince.

But that doesn’t mean CBD doesn’t work.

2. You Didn’t Let CBD Build Up in Your System

The first time you try CBD may feel as if you’d wasted your money on some overhyped product. You know, you just put a few drops of CBD oil under your tongue, expecting near-instant relief from your chronic pain, and… NOTHING HAPPENS!

So, does it mean CBD isn’t working?

While some of the effects of CBD oil may be noticeable right away, CBD usually needs some time to let you experience its health benefits. In fact, many people take CBD for at least two weeks before they see a difference.

Exploring the effects of CBD isn’t as simple as getting a couple of pills and calling it a day. Proper supplementation actually requires consistency and a certain level of commitment to uncovering the long-term effects.

If you’re still not able to tell the difference before and after your dose of CBD, it may be time to move on and try a different company.

Keeping a CBD journal can help you keep track of your progress and whether or not CBD oil works for you.

Patience is very important in the process, and while it can be annoying to keep trying with no results, you may end up feeling thankful that you didn’t stop.

3. You need to Find the Right Dosage

Finding an appropriate dose of CBD can be challenging. The right amount varies between individuals, as every person has unique body chemistry that results in a different response.

So, how do you know what’s right for you?

A general rule of thumb is to start with a low dose — like 5–10 mg twice a day — and slowly increase it over time until you find the dose that provides the desired results.

Some users find that taking CBD in daily doses can help sustain a certain level of CBD in your body, which may support your endocannabinoid system to make it react better to cannabinoids like CBD.

Many people use a micro-dosing method to find their optimal dosage and adjust it as needed over time.

Again, a dosage journal may help you keep track of how much you’ve taken, how you feel before and after dosing, and if the CBD oil is working for you.

4. You Need a Different Consumption Method

Cannabis entrepreneurs can get really creative, and you can tell it by looking at the product selection in most online stores.

CBD is sold in everything from CBD coffee to bath salts and tampons.

The most common forms of CBD include:

  1. CBD oils
  2. CBD capsules
  3. CBD vape oils
  4. CBD topical creams
  5. CBD edibles (e.g. gummies and honey sticks)

If you’ve found that CBD oil isn’t working for you, it’s possible that a different form would solve the problem.

One factor to keep in mind is bioavailability, which essentially refers to the amount of CBD that actually reaches your bloodstream.

For example, products like CBD capsules and gummies have to go through your digestive system before the body can absorb them. The amount that ends up in your system may be relatively low.

Tinctures, on the other hand, offer higher bioavailability due to their route of delivery. Tinctures are absorbed through tiny capillaries under the tongue, so you’re absorbing them directly into your bloodstream. Not only does more CBD get into your body, but it also has a faster onset.

Speaking of which, the fastest delivery method of CBD is through vaping. Vaporized CBD enters the body through the lungs, ensuring that the effects show up within minutes from inhalation.

Other products, such as topicals, engage with the cannabinoid receptors in the skin, so they have virtually “zero bioavailability” but offer potential relief from localized problems.

5. You Take CBD Isolate

CBD isolate is just pure CBD in a crystallized, powdered form. Despite providing the highest concentration of CBD per serving (~990 mg per gram), it is considered less efficient and more difficult to dose than whole-plant extracts.

That’s because products like full-spectrum CBD oil produce the “entourage effect.” This term refers to a synergy achieved by all compounds naturally occurring in cannabis plants. This synergy makes the compounds more effective together than in isolation. Studies suggest that whole-plant extracts allow the user to overcome the bell-shaped dose-response, where the effects of CBD don’t always improve with an increase in the dosage.

If CBD oil isn’t working for you, maybe it’s time to switch from CBD isolate to full-spectrum CBD.

6. Tolerance, Genetics & Metabolism

CBD is a versatile tool for improving one’s quality of life, but it’s not a miracle drug that will fix you overnight. If, after all your efforts, CBD oil isn’t working for you, this means your body has difficulty absorbing it.

The level of absorption and response to CBD depends on several factors, such as:

  • Biochemistry
  • Genetics
  • Metabolism

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a complex neurochemical network in your body that interacts with cannabinoids, and each person’s ECS operates a little differently.

According to psychiatrists, 20% of Americans may have a genetic mutation that makes them naturally produce more endocannabinoids — the endogenous analogs of the cannabinoids you ingest when using cannabis.

If you have that mutation, you might be less prone to stress and anxiety, but because you already have enough endocannabinoids, you might not see many improvements when you take CBD.

Checking with your doctor may help you discover other natural options that may work for you.

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all treatment, so don’t be afraid to tell your friends to stop bugging you about giving CBD a try.

7. You’re Expecting Miracles from CBD

Some people may feel like they wasted their money on a hyped product simply because the effects of CBD don’t match their expectations. However, this isn’t an argument to support the theory that CBD oil doesn’t work. If you expect CBD oil to cure cancer or mend broken bones, you may have a hard time waiting for such effects, because CBD doesn’t do such things. It’s a very valuable compound with high efficacy and a well-established safety profile, but it does have limitations — something which many people tend to forget.

Bottom Line: Why CBD Doesn’t Work for Some People

CBD isn’t as regulated as many other supplements and pharmaceutical compounds, and people in the industry are still trying to figure out the best practices to maximize its efficacy.

It’s not as simple as taking some standard dosage and feeling immediate effects. Sometimes, CBD takes time, patience, and ongoing research to find the right vendor, dosage, and form of consumption for you.

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Buying from several different brands can also get pricey — but many premium companies offer discounts, coupon codes, and reward programs that help you save money on your favorite products or try new forms of CBD for less.

So before you abandon the idea of supplementing CBD altogether, use the above checklist to find out why CBD isn’t working for you.

5 Reasons why CBD may not be working for you

CBD, technically known as cannabidiol, has become an increasingly popular supplement in today’s world.

More and more people each day are choosing to try CBD oil and other CBD products for themselves. However, even the best CBD may not be able to offer all of the benefits that a user was looking for.

While there is a great deal of hype around CBD, the truth is that it is a simple compound like everything else in the world, and while it may be beneficial to the healthcare regimen for many, for others it may not offer much in the way of benefits at all.

But why do some people feel the effects of CBD strongly, while other people seem to feel no effects at all? In this article we are going to explore the five main reasons why CBD may not be working for you and what the simple remedies to these issues may be.

CBD & your body interact in a variety of ways

Before we delve too deeply into why CBD may not be working, we should first be sure we have a basic understanding of what CBD is and how it works within us.

CBD is a cannabinoid, one of over a hundred cannabinoids that can be found within the cannabis plant. The cannabis family of plants can be a bit confusing since laws as much as science has dictated their classifications. For example, marijuana is cannabis with a high THC content, while hemp is cannabis with a low THC content (and a much higher CBD content). It is also worth noting that CBD and THC may both come from cannabis but affect our body in very different ways. Unlike THC, CBD is not psychoactive, and will not cause you to feel “high”.

CBD and other cannabinoids found within the cannabis plant interact with cannabinoid receptors within our endocannabinoid system. Without getting into too much detail, this endocannabinoid system is found throughout our bodies and is how CBD may be responsible for helping people in so many different ways.

For example, we have seen claims of CBD being used to aid wellness treatments in much the same way as medical marijuana and medical cannabis. CBD has reportedly been used to help relieve symptoms of health conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Dravet syndrome, and chronic pain. Perhaps most famously, the drug regulatory agency in the USA approved the use of Epidiolex, a drug based on CBD, for treatment of the symptoms of epilepsy.

Most people who take CBD today claim to take it for some form of pain relief or as a replacement for more harmful antidepressants. Currently, the medical community has no consensus on the efficacy of CBD for these issues however many studies are currently under way and the medical usage of CBD is becoming a more common thing each day.

5 reasons CBD isn’t working for you

The following are the five main reasons you are not getting what you expect out of your CBD supplements.

1. The consumption method you use

There are a whole host of ways to take CBD including oils, tinctures, vape pens, edibles, creams, and even niche things like shampoos and inhalers. However, each of these methods will take effect in your body slightly differently and the method you are currently using may not sync up well with either your needs or your unique body chemistry. Make sure you research the method of CBD you are taking and experiment with popular alternatives.

Some important points on consumption methods:

  • Topical creams are better for more localized issues, like muscle pains and anti-inflammatory needs, and are likely not going to work when it comes to usage for digestive or mental relief.
  • Edibles like gummies first need to pass through the digestive system before they enter the bloodstream, meaning less than 20% (the bioavailability of CBD is between 13% and 19%) of the CBD you eat actually goes to work providing some form of relief.

2. You are using a CBD isolate product

As we touched on before, CBD interacts with your endocannabinoid system as do the other cannabinoids like CBN, CBG, and even Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the terpenes and flavonoids found naturally within the cannabis plant.

Studies have shown that when you take a full-spectrum CBD product, which is a form of cannabidiol that contains the full suite of natural compounds found in the cannabis plant, that you will benefit from all the compounds working synergistically together. A significant amount of anecdotal evidence suggests that this natural interaction, called the entourage effect, can potentially have much more powerful health benefits.

If you are taking a CBD isolate you are not benefiting from the potentially powerful entourage effect and this may be a reason as to why your CBD product is not working for you.

3. Quality and dosage

Another issue is that the CBD market is rife with poorly made or mislabelled products that may not be giving you the proper dose of CBD at a high-quality level. Although the government has initiated some regulation, the CBD market currently does not have uniform standards for all aspects of the business and thus it can be hard to sort through all of the noise to find the items worth buying. In some cases, you may even find things like hemp seed oil being mislabelled as CBD oil

In order to avoid these low-quality products, you want to look for brands that offer you the Certificates of Analysis of third-party lab testing results. These lab results will allow you to see if the product contains any harmful pesticides, as well as letting you see its overall purity and potency.

You want to find quality products from trusted brands that offer you lab results from independent test laboratories, and who derive their CBD from organic hemp, which will result in cleaner flowers and subsequent products. The best CBD is often grown in Colorado, but there are many farms in other US states and Europe that are beginning to offer strong competition. Try to avoid companies relying on mass-produced hemp.

The classic customer reviews are also a good final line against buying poor quality items. Make sure that the CBD you are buying has made plenty of happy customers in the past. Most people who use CBD have had to try one or more brands before finding the product they were most happy with. Do not be afraid to shop around.

4. Tolerance, genetics, and metabolism

If you are not feeling the expected effects from CBD another issue may be that your internal chemistry is simply not working well with the CBD. It may be the method of CBD that you are taking is not readily absorbed into your body, or that you have a naturally high tolerance.

For example, some scientists theorize that roughly 20% of people may have naturally high levels of cannabinoids, meaning they are likely able to handle stress better but will see less positive results from taking further cannabinoids like CBD.

There is no easy way to tell if this is why you don’t seem to be benefitting from CBD, though you may be able to talk with your doctor about other forms of supplements that you may have a better reaction to. It could be as simple as a brand change, or as dramatic as a switch to a whole new type of compound.

5. CBD may need to build up in your system

Sometimes you simply need to be patient. The endocannabinoid system is not like other internal systems and sometimes the way we interact with it is a little different. Cannabidiol usage is not like simply taking a pill and walking away, in some cases, people need to wait up to two weeks before they see benefits from CBD use! Of course, this will heavily depend on the benefits you are seeking and your method of consumption.

Give a product time, and allow your body the time to fully adapt and utilize the cannabinoids you are putting into it before you totally give up on a product.

The truth is that much of the science around CBD is very young and is currently focused on the possible benefits of CBD usage, and not so much the mechanisms around how these benefits occur. This means you may need to do a great deal of research and testing to find the product and method that is perfect for you. Giving it time may just be the trick that works for you.

Are you ready to give CBD another try?

If you are reading this article then that means that you have likely tried CBD in the past and were not fully happy with the results. Hopefully, this article has shown you that one or two missed attempts does not mean that you need to give up on CBD just yet.

There are a ton of ways to take CBD and the variations when it comes to quality are great. Be patient and give yourself time to find the absolute perfect brand for your needs. When you do, your body will thank you. We recommend buying from Blessed CBD via our CBD store , or read through our best CBD oils and best CBD gummies buyer’s guides.

4. Blessed CBD:

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